Moonlight, Starlight and Sunlight


The Legend of St IA

So many times Keith has represented the moon with a female image. He generally painted the moon as feminine and the sun as masculine.

St IA was a real person who came to St Ives from Ireland to teach Christianity. She had a brother named Erth who travelled with several other missionaries to Cornwall. She wanted to come with them but as so often happened to women of that time, was told it was unseemly so she was left behind. This did not stop her. Legend tells us that she arrived on Porthmeor Beach sailing upon a leaf. (This was most likely an Irish boat made of skins which resembled a leaf to the people on the shore.)  Young IA (or Eia) was most fortunate, for the currents that brought her could have just as likely taken her as far as Nova Scotia or beyond. At a tender age (perhaps as young as 15 or 16) she set up her teaching station on what the locals call the 'Island' where St Nicholas' Chapel sits today. It very likely was surrounded by water in those days, much as St Michael's Mount is stranded with the tides. It all ended badly for IA, her brother and his fellow missionaries as King Theodoric of Hayle objected to this new religion and had them all killed. But his objective backfired! The Cornish are a strong and stubborn lot when it comes to telling them what to do or what to believe. Each village not only renamed themselves after their respective missionary (St Erth, St Just, St Ives, etc) but they also incorporated these new teachings into their lives. Keith used to joke that even today the rugby and football teams between St Ives and Hayle carry on this ancient feud! The Cornish name for St Ives Is Porthia or IA's Cove.

Prints of "The Legend of St IA"  have all been sold, as it was a limited run of 500. There are, however, canvas prints available, of which there will only ever be 100. These can be ordered in 2 sizes for £250 (16" square) or £350 (18" square) respectively. Each print is numbered and has Keith's embossed seal applied. There is one and only one large version of The Legend of St IA which is the same size as the original measuring 30" square and since this blog was released has now been sold. There will not be another printed in this largest size.

Cosmic Dreamer
Keith represented stars with lovely Goddesses who, as archetypes, are assigned to lovingly protect their charges. Starlight has guided us for many centuries and who can look upon the Milky Way and not think of God? Here Keith is expressing the Mother aspect of God or the Divine Feminine.

White Buffalo Woman
An exception to this concept of moonlight and starlight being in the realms of the feminine is his painting of a Native American legend "White Buffalo Woman". This painting is definitely depicting a archetypical  Sun Goddess. She was a great teacher to her people, teaching them of the buffalo, the growing of corn and introducing the pipe of peace. This is one of two spiritual paintings that Keith painted in the summer of 1988 that began all the rest.

Sun God
This very masculine painting 'Sun God' shows a different side of the archetype. Many ancient religions based their God on the rising and the setting of our sun.

Keith's friend Barry

Sir George Trevelyan


Earth Healer


And now I show you the very first painting that consciously began Keith's vast repertoire of spiritual works. This was painted in July of 1988. Keith had a friend named Barry who posed for this painting. Many people thought Keith painted Sir George Trevelyan, a great spiritual author and metaphysician. In fact Keith and I exhibited this painting in the St Georges Room in Glastonbury in the spring of 1990. At that very time and venue, Sir George was there to give a talk. I have to admit that there was an uncanny likeness! And during that same exhibition White Buffalo Woman was sold to a woman who moved with it to Australia. With the proceeds of this sale we were able to send for four of my five children who were in the USA. (My eldest was going to University and married shortly after this.) The children were able to stay with us from this year forward and Keith was a remarkable stepfather. Our family was full of beans and lots of love, as you can imagine! It was after this that we opened the Keith English Gallery located in the Harbour Galleries on Wharf Road. That is where I met most of you. This is a good time for me to say thank you for each of you who visited us year after year on your holidays with your families. Without your support and interaction Keith would not have painted so many paintings or so well. He loved to paint among you and there was a symbiotic relationship that was important to him, a form of energy exchange. The ambience of the gallery was enhanced by each one of your visits. I am so grateful for those special years!      
Many blessings, Jodieanne

Prints of Cosmic Dreamer, White Buffalo Woman, Sun God and Earth Healer are on Offer for the special price of £50 with postage paid to the UK until 12 May 2018.


Comments

  1. Hello from the United States: A disabled friend of mine (Nancy Wilson) purchased a signed, original oil painting by Keith English "Towards the End of Time" from your gallery in 1992-93. Nancy said she and her husband met Mr. & Mrs. English at the time of purchase. They also purchased 120+ collectible cards of his paintings. Unfortunately In 2006, Nancy and her husband Scott where in an terrible automobile accident. He died and she became disabled. She is on a pension and believes it is time to sell the painting which she loves dearly. She has asked me to put the sale on Ebay and I will do that shortly. However, I thought I would contact the artists' family to see if there is any interest in purchasing this original for your gallery or maybe offer some advice as to it's worth in U.S. dollars. Any information you can give us would be greatly appreciated.

    Phyllis Gagnon
    Mountain Ridge Bed & Breakfast
    117 Seneca Road
    Murphy, NC 28906
    mtnridge117@yahoo.com

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